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BIG DRAW 2017 – LIVING LINES

Geddington Brickyard Garden is hosting a

Community Arts Festival

Sunday 22nd October 2017

BIG DRAW 2017 – LIVING LINES

All are welcome to this exciting community art event – so come and have a go! No art experience required! This will be a fun day for family and friends – all ages are welcome.

There are 4 workshops throughout the day, try one or try them all!
‘Landlines’ 10.45 – 11.30am
‘Garden Lines’ 12.15 – 1.15pm
‘Human Lines’ 2.15 – 3.15pm
‘Imagined Lines’ 4 – 4.45pm
We welcome an audience who would ‘just like to watch’, but it would be great to have people joining in!

To book a place on the workshops you wish to attend (from one to all four) and for further information, then please email: gbg.action.group@gmail.com with the subject heading; ‘Big Draw 2017’ and state:
–  Number of people you are booking
–  Which workshop
–  Their ages (Ages: Under 11, 11-15, 16-18, 18 and over)
–  If you require disabled access (We are able to offer vehicular access up to the site, by arrangement.).
OR
Book on Eventbrite at this address: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/big-draw-living-lines-tickets-38341559637. For more information about Big Draw, please visit the Big Draw website – click on Festival.

For updates on this event, please visit the Geddington Brickyard Garden page in the Village Life column on this site or the Geddington Brickyard Garden Facebook page.

Please note: This event is running whatever the weather, we will have marquees and tents for shelter and refreshments. Dress for mess and the weather!

This event is being supported using Public Funding by Arts Council England and Kettering Borough Council.

Emma Davies drawing Living Lines at Sudborough Green Lodge, Fermynwoods Contemporary Art

The Magna Carta King strikes again . . .

Geddington.net is combining ancient
(well, mediaeval in this case)
and modern history for this evening event.

Join us for a light-hearted review, following new research, on the life and times of King John, the Magna Carta King.

Our narrator is Vic Crouse and the only thing he is asking, is for you to bring your imagination on

Friday 20th October
at 7.30pm

There is no admission charge, but as we’re meeting in the Village Hall Lounge, where there is limited space, tickets will be available on a first come, first served basis.

Tickets from:
editor@geddington.net or
Pam Hopkins, 9 Grafton Road or
Telephone: 742290
Admission is by ticket only, so don’t forget to bring them.

We will be providing (free) tea, coffee and fancy biscuits

Trundling on

Geddington Cricket Club &
Geddington Volunteer Fire Brigade

held their annual Trundle on Sunday 24 September in brilliant sunshine (those were the days!).

Thanks to Paul Boniface, Geddington.net is able to bring you a picturesque flavour of the day.

And the tug-of-war between North Geddington & South Geddington:

Well done everyone who took part – very brave people,
even if they knew what they were in for,
and especially if they didn’t!

People and places of Geddington – Lee’s Way Part 5

November 7th 1952

Last night Twinky and I attended the 22nd Rotary Club dinner and dance at the Park. When we left a terrific gale was blowing – 90mph. We saw several large tree trunks on the road – the wind was quite terrifying.

The cottage now is standing patiently awaiting its topknot. Paul hopes to get the tiles on this week.

January 24th 1953

Today is my birthday. Twelve months ago today I tripped down to Wilsons…to purchase ‘The Den’. Since that sunny day much water has flowed under the bridge, many stones have come down and many bricks have gone up!

Then the roof timbers, chimney and tiles

Twinkie and I are happily betrothed, our cottage is almost completed and we about ready to start on life’s journey together. What more could one ask? My Twink and I are now busily planning inside decoration colour schemes – furniture placing, carpets and curtains.

Diamond paned windows and a garden wall

28th March 1953

We have just written away to book our honeymoon – to all enquiries – destination unknown.

We have progressed favourably with the decorating…the doors… grained oak. We went to London to buy carpets…The Little House seems very warm and cosy with our two fires going, the diamond panes and the big front door give it a most distinguished look.

and finally an historic front door and porch

          Twinky has been to Leicester and got her wedding gown. We are to have three bridesmaids.

19th April 1953

Dashed off to church..Took communion and listened to our banns ‘for the first time of asking’…then off to our little home. Mr Jim Palmer is to give a final painting touch to the interior. We are finished outside. We are now agog, waiting to get carpets  down and curtains up. Very thrilling, watching our home preparing itself to receive us. It has a welcome look on its face and just seems to be waiting for us.

Saturday May 16th 1953

The Church was beautifully decorated – the service was simple and very lovely – my bride was there to the second and looked the happiest and most beautiful bride ever seen. We both listened to the Canon’s speech most carefully and we both said after the ceremony that we enjoyed it terrifically… I vividly remember coming down from the vestry, my new wife on my arm, grinning at each other and both gazing out at the sea of faces- the church was crowded..then out into the sunshine..Then amidst a bustle and a tear, a laughing mob threw confetti and we went away to the reception.

Pip and Cynthia had juggled house building with wedding plans and had achieved their dream. Perhaps the final touch on top of their wedding cake says just how much their love of Geddington meant to them…

…The Eleanor Cross

The final words of this story go to Pip who records these words on the last page of his journal:

‘Our lives are blended together so very securely and happily that to attempt to describe the complete wonder of living is utterly impossible. If heaven has anything more wonderful to offer, then we shall be surprised!’

Thank you Pip, thank you Cynthia, for such a loving record of life in a small cottage in a much loved village.

The Autumn Equinox

People and Places of Geddington – Lee’s Way Part 4

While the demolition and clearing of the rubble got underway, Pip and Cynthia carried on with their lives, though the plans for the newly built part of the cottage were never far from their minds. This next chapter in their story describes how they came by two very individual additions to their new home.

‘Cynthia and myself went to a most glorious ‘do’ at Deene on the 9th. We had a wonderful time, definitely one of the most enjoyable ‘dos’ of all time – but – just look at my partner!

Starmer and Valentine at the Council offices have proved most friendly and helpful – and a loan should be reasonably easily negotiated from them. Mr Williams came to view the date stone, 1320, found in the debris – and found Cynthia furiously digging one side of the garden and myself gently attacking t’other side. He appeared a little surprised!

We popped over to Weekly Church last Sunday morn and watched Princess Margaret go to service. Later we visited ‘the site’ and chatted with Nurse Henshaw and her sister.. Also nipped in local for a beer. Had tea at Cynthia’s -we went to Desboro’ Church evening serviceand I sat imagining us coming down the aisle – quivering!’

May 15th 1952 Red Letter Day!!!     Read on to find out why…

June 11th ‘The story of a door’

‘Chicken and I were taking Pete Riley and Betty for a ride around. We had driven up to Finedon Hall and had explored the uninhabited buildings (we thought) when we were hailed from aloft. We espied a woman on the balcony directly above us, who was evidently addressing us in no uncertain terms, informing us that we were on private property. The old place has been turned into a research laboratory – cancer, malaria and other malignant diseases….

However, I deviate from THE DOOR… We then visited the Volta Tower, as was. This structure was originally built as a memorial to a son, lost at sea; it was built of huge ironstone blocks, uncemented. The mining folk evidently came too close with their pits and whatnot and undermined the structure, which collapsed. Behind the mass of masonry, we found a lovely garden, full of roses in full bloom. Then, hey presto, Chick and I saw the DOOR – and decided that that was the sort we wanted!’

Pip planned to try to purchase the door as a surprise for Cynthia but, as he himself acknowledges in his diary, he couldn’t keep the secret and ended up telling her! However he was very ingenious in finding the owner and doing a deal. It involved a trip to The Red Lion in Cranford and then a trip to The Bell in Finedon. Here he met ‘a tall, white haired old man’ who gave him the name of the son of the owner of the Volta Tower and told him he lived in Burton Latimer. Pip’s next step was to call in on the local bobby there and find out the address. On meeting the son, Mr Northen, Pip realised they had been at school together and the deal to buy the door was done for the princely sum of £4!

Pip concludes by celebrating the fact that:  we now have…a door…a door knocker…a copper warming pan..a pew….. a chair….and a plan.

21st July 1952

On July 4th ( Independence Day) Cynthia and I announced our engagement. I ‘popped the question’ at Triangular Lodge. I also asked Mr Goode’s sanction and blessing. Everyone was delighted…The ring, which we purchased on 15th May, is of a S shaped setting- antique- emerald one side, ruby the other, wee diamonds in between – a real beauty…proposed 20th March for wedding day….I should dearly love to take my love to Capri for honeymoon but !!!…..  £.s.d. – ah me!

September 1952 Reconstruction begins

As Pip and Cynthia’s plans for their marriage began to take shape so did the cottage…and by September building had begun, though the difficulties were not all resolved and Pip remained somewhat exasperated by the need to repair Hopkins’ cottage before their own roof could go on.

Earlier it was mentioned that Pip and Cynthia came by a second item that became an integral part of their home. This is how Pip describes the find;

A stone was found under our original stairs -face down – this stone is carved rather like a church window – and, at my partner’s suggestion, it is now embedded in the wall facing the front door, conjuring up peculiar mysteries of its origin ..’

A part of the Cross or a remnant of Geddington Palace or Hunting Lodge?

Next week we celebrate a wedding and the ‘topping out’ of the home that has emerged from the rubble.

 

Water, water everywhere . . .

You’ll never know the worth of water
till your well runs dry.

Food, Glorious Food!

St Mary Magdalene Church,
Geddington

For those who aren’t connected to Facebook, priest in charge, Rob Parker-McGee has posted the following information for residents of Geddington:

If you find yourself in need of some emergency supplies or fresh produce, there are some non-perishable provisions and some produce, fresh from the field, in the church porch – please feel free to help yourself!

EQUALLY, if you have a glut of produce in your garden or allotment or a few spare tins, why not drop it in to the church porch and share it with the village.

People and Places of Geddington – Lee’s Way Part 3

Tuesday 4th March 1952   BLACK DAY

This is how Pip describes the events of the day that brought his and Cynthia’s dreams close to collapse.

His diary continues;

Paul Jessop informs me that a bad fall has occurred – the end wall is partly down. Williams and Valentine (CC man) go over and inspect.

Thursday 6th  – Paul and myself go over and meet Valentine there. Cynthia rang up and I told her the sad news.- she wanted to howl. For a while we believed that the whole thing would have to be demolished. I would have to pay (about £100) and pay for a new wall to be built on next door cottage – another £100. This morning I went to the council offices and told Valentine that it represented my life’s savings and could we have a go at re-building. He was sceptical at first but I persevered and he has temporarily put off the demolition order.

There was some discussions about how to proceed but both Pip and his builder, Paul, knew it was touch and go.

March 14th 1952

Bob Chapman, Pip’s neighbour, was there to watch with Pip as tons and tons of rubble were removed. Pip describes how the whole cottage had been propped up and everyone waited to see if it would collapse or not.

‘They intend to remove the entire end wall – no mean job – a matter of shifting over 100  tons, then, if the remaining skeleton is still standing reasonably rigid, to commence rebuilding all three walls. 

Clearing the rubble

No back wall!

     These past few days have been the worst nightmare of my life.’

 There were however some lighter moments; visiting the cottage with friends and sympathisers they climbed into the bedrooms, over the rubble and Pip went into the roof space. According to him it was ‘absolutely rotten’ but he also reported that ‘the old boy next door had found an ancient pair of cord breeches which he swore were 150 years old!!’ 

4th April 1952

All propped up – will it hold?

Cynthia and I visited The Wreck. I climbed up over the rubble and into the bedrooms and put all the lights on. Lit the whole place up. A lady approached us and introduced herself as my other neighbour, the nurse in the cottage above. We were invited in and shown over the whole place. Beautiful and intriguing cottage – we sat and chatted for half an hour and found the nurse to be a most charming woman.

A few days later Pip was informed that, at a meeting of Jessop the builder, Gair, Sinnat, the Duke’s agent, and the council men, a proposal had been pulled together which would mean that the collapsed building could be demolished but the Duke’s agent would be responsible for making good the apex of the adjoining cottage.

By May 12th the old cottage had disappeared; in Pip’s words ‘ Cynthia and I stood on the erstwhile site, held hands, mutely, and sighed!’

A little overwhelmed by the ‘domino effect’ of the building works, Pip reports that the same thing has happened to the Hopkins’ cottage next door;  ‘I, of course, am responsible for it. As I said to Mr Williams, this could go on ‘ad infinitum’ and I may as well repair, replace and rebuild the whole of Geddington’ !!

What next?

Next week we look at how the rebuild went, including the story of the front door, alongside plans for a wedding.

People and Places of Geddington – Lee’s Way Part 2

It is  November 1951. We left Pip Barlow admiring the cottage in Lee’s Way and the adjoining derelict plot owned by the Duke.

How could this neglected building and the neighbouring plot become a family home? Pip could see all the possibilities and was meticulous in putting the detailed plans together as he, and Cynthia, the lady he hoped would agree to be his wife, discussed their dreams for the future.

It would be no small task to revive the existing building and would take time and money, patience and expertise too, to re-build the derelict structure and incorporate it into their new home.

Not everything went quite to plan…..

‘Twelve or fifteen years ago, No 41 was sold for £45. In June last it was put up for sale; 120 applicants immediately wished to purchase same for £400. The owner for some unknown reason cancelled the sale order and retained the cottage. It has stood empty for a year.

The derelict cottages looking down Lee’s Way towards West Street

I can purchase same for £350, owing to the friendship of Donald Bates at Wilson’s estate agents of Dalkeith Place.  I have contacted the Duke’s agent with regard to purchasing the 2 adjoining derelict cottages; I can buy those for £25.’

Pip then set out his key alterations to make his purchase a cosy home:

  1. To knock down the wall to the left of the fireplace and to build in a glass-type door to allow as much light in as possible. (Mrs Chapman who lives at the rear will not allow a window to be put in overlooking her garden.)
  2. To knock out part of the end wall to the left of the chimney in the small bedroom and to build in a window.
  3. To dig away the earth from the lawn of Mrs Chapman’s house, which is about 4ft up my back wall and to form a gulley of cement.
  4. To block up the hole in the wall to Mrs Chapman’s garden…

The list continued and included provision for the necessary facilities of water and sewage to be laid on.

As mentioned in the introductory article Pip was a practical and determined man. He decided to consult about the cost and any permissions needed and on Boxing Day 1951 noted the following in his diary:

‘I have contacted young Jessop with regard to my proposed alterations and he estimates that if done in brick the cost would be roughly £120 – £200. Later I took Ray Ollerenshaw over and he put it down at nearly £300. I intend to ask advice from other quarters.

Two men from Kettering Urban Council have looked over it and have given me their opinions; apparently they have a right to insist upon certain conditions of lighting and sewage etc which must conform to their regulations.’

By January 24th 1952 the big decision to purchase had been made and builders were sought.

‘Today is my 35th birthday. I have paid by cheque to Peter Wilson the sum of £315 (having previously paid a deposit of £35) for 41 West Street, henceforward to be known as ‘The Den’.

The derelict cottages looking up Lee’s Way towards Back Way or Queen Eleanor Road

By previous appointment I met a Mr Suckling of Lindsay Street, builder, recommended to me by George Thompson. He seems a most honourable and conscientious man and we discussed necessary improvements…’

There was some debate about building the cottage in stone or brick; stone would certainly be too expensive for Pip, but before a final decision could be made national events distracted Pip from his task.  

                                                                    

George VI

The King is dead, long live the Queen!   

‘George VI passed away in his sleep -all UK and the world mourn a great and loved monarch.’

Will Pip be able to find a builder able to do the job within his budget and the requirements of those gentlemen from Kettering Urban Council?

It will certainly be a challenge!

‘February 17th 1952

I ran Roy round to Bill Wilde’s today, to see about getting him a job. Later we dashed over to The Den to light a fire. Paul Jessop has already taken doors and window frames over – also a wheel barrow and cement.

Last Monday, at Cynthia’s request, I took her over to Geddington after an excellent dinner at The Royal. Whilst we were looking over the cot a knock came at the door – I looked out, no-one in sight. Waited just inside and when another knock came dashed out and saw Eddy disappearing up the alley. He and Jint were invited to inspect and were agreeably surprised at the possibilities.’

Eddy wasn’t the only one to be curious about what was happening at the cottage…

‘March 1st   Paul tells me he has felled the chimney- and that the whole village turned out to watch. He has also moved 14 tons of rubble to be scattered in various gateways of mud….the plans are to go before the Council this Wednesday.

Paul laughed and said that the dust and muck caused by the chimney falling hid the whole village for 6 hours and everyone lost everybody’ !!

So far so good….. but our next installment reveals some serious difficulties to be overcome.

**************************************************************************************************************************A  Author’s note; we believe Jint or Jinty was Eddy’s girlfriend and Eddy, one of Pip’s best friends, may have lived in the cottage by the ford and kept canaries as a hobby.  Do you remember them?

 

 

 

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