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Home Emergency Plans – with Flooding in mind!

What is the first thing you would save if your house was affected by a disaster?

Have you got an escape route if fire or water should bar you from your front or back door?

If your teenager rang you at work and said the house was hit by a (natural) disaster, who would you call?

If your house was uninhabitable, where would you stay?

Have you talked to your children about using 999 correctly?

These may sound like last-case scenarios and questions, but they have all happened  and these questions asked – plus many more and many times over.

SURFACE WATER FLOODING

Groundwater flooding

Groundwater flooding

– is a boring heading for a natural disaster that
hits thousands of home-owners every year, but  scary questions such as those above, make us sit up and listen.

FLOOD AWARENESS PROJECT

At Monday night’s packed meeting in the Village Hall (lounge), 20 people (that’s more than they normally have apparently) listened to Mary Dhonau from the Community Flood Consultants, and her colleagues Richard Jones, Flood Investigator and Jo from Northamptonshire County Council’s Flood & Water Management Department, give an update to the Flood Awareness Road Show that was held in July.

Mary made it clear, that when she talks about flooding, she isn’t just talking about homes near rivers. Surface water flooding is the stuff of nightmares as it hits when least expected and to the least expected areas. Anyone living in Bright Trees Road or Wood Street prior to 1998, would have thought their chance of flooding to be pretty poor, but the run-off water from the fields, PLUS the rising ground water from weeks of rain, PLUS a blocked drain, put an end to any complacency that may have been held. Read more →

ARCHIVE : ACTION #7

ARCHIVE : ACTION #7

Archive: a collection of records of a place
Action: the process of doing something

In July, we asked if we could borrow, scan, photo or copy, any photographs, documents or artefacts that would represent Geddington’s history over the centuries.

Our aim is to create an online archive of our village.

Our weekly article covers the seventh and last category before the Archive Exhibition, which is:

THE WAR MEMORIAL

The Armistice of Compiègne between the Allies and Germany was signed and went into effect at 11am on Monday 11th November 1918. “On hearing the news, Geddington’s church bells were rung and a service of thanksgiving was held that evening,” although it wasn’t until 28th June 1919 that the official Peace Treaty was signed.  Geddington celebrated with a Peace Day on 25 July: 240 children were treated to tea and the soldiers were entertained to a meat tea. “However, the sports and other amusements had to be postponed due to the weather, but these were eventually held in August in a field loaned by Mr York A Hopkins.”

During the coming months, an elected committee of 10, met to discuss the possibility of a memorial monument. “The following January in 1920, a public meeting was called, with the Revd Benjamin Turton presiding, to discuss the final report. It recommended that a monument should be erected in the churchyard to those who had fallen, and a tablet should be placed in the church bearing all the 170 names of the men who had answered the call of their country. This proposal was unanimously adopted.”

In March 1920, another public meeting met to inspect the plans for the Cross and Memorial Tablet: the meeting unanimously passed the committee’s recommendation.

 

Order of Service 1921

Order of Service 1921

On 24 June 1921, work commenced on the erection of the memorial, and Thursday 28th July saw the unveiling and a dedication service of the Cross, a tablet to the memory of the choir boys who laid down their lives and a memorial window to the honour of the late Harry Arthur Patrick. The unveiling was performed by Major Wetherall of Northampton and the dedication by the vicar, Revd Turton. A very large crowd of villagers and their children, ex-servicemen, nursing sisters, relatives of the fallen, various religious denominations of the village and visitors from the surrounding district attended. After the service and dedication, relatives of the fallen placed so many wreaths around the base and steps of the Cross, that the simple inscription on the panel was hidden:

1914 – 1918 In undying memory of the men of Geddington
who gave their lives for us.

Many of the excerpts have been taken from the book ‘Geddington A Village at War’, edited and compiled by Melvyn Hopkins. It is a very comprehensive diary of events from 1914 to 1921.

Why not come along and meet Melvyn at the Exhibition on 1st November, where he can answer (some of) your queries and explain others?

If you have any information, documents or pictures relating to any normal day-to-day living in the village during the past few decades (or earlier, if you have them) we would like to hear from you or why not bring them to the Exhibition, where we have a team of experts who will scan, copy or photograph them?

The Exhibition on Saturday 1st November is not the end of our Archive Project, but just the start of what we hope will be an ongoing project over the next few years. With more material and research we’ll be bringing many more fascinating facts to light.

We Did Remember Them !

WE DID REMEMBER THEM !

On 17th October, 30 members of the Geddington volunteer Fire Brigade travelled to Flanders Fields in Belgium, in an act of remembrance for those who fell during the First World War.

Based in Ypres, the group visited the Menin Gate, where all those who fell in Flanders are listed (but whose remains haven’t been found), together with both British and German cemeteries.

At the Hooge Crater cemetery, where a Geddington man, Private George Rawson is buried, a simple but moving ceremony was conducted by Geddington vicar, Rob Parker-McGee, war poems were read and the Last Post played by Fireman Andrew Hammond.

The idea was that of Commanding Officer, Gyles Dickens, who organised the visit, and which will live in the memory of all who attended for some time to come.

ARCHIVE : ACTION #6

ARCHIVE : ACTION #6

Archive: a collection of records of a place
Action: the process of doing something

In July, we asked if we could borrow, scan, photo or otherwise copy, any photographs, documents or artefacts that would represent Geddington’s history over the centuries.

Our aim is to create an online archive of our village.

Our weekly article covers the sixth category which is:

THE CHURCH

There have been many booklets written about the church by several of the vicars whilst in residence: that written by the Revd Thomas Woolfenden will be in the Exhibition. The history is, therefore, well recorded. What is not so well-known is the churchyard.

In 2004, the Northamptonshire Family History Society, with co-operation from the Revd Giles Godber and the churchwardens, Mr Ken Ryan and Mrs Margaret Leaton, completed a comprehensive plan of the Churchyard.

With their permission, the plan and some of the information that they gained has been reproduced here.

PLAN OF THE CHURCHYARD

Plan of GraveyardThe churchyard is large and divided into sections by paths. In the Plan, the sections are designated A to H. The older stones are mainly found to the south of the church, whilst the newer sections extend back some distance to the north side of the church and the newest section of all is found to the east of the church.

In the accompanying drawing by Thomas Eyre in 1712,Church 1712 by Thomas Ayre
there appear to be no headstones in the area immediately behind the church, in what is now termed Section E on the Plan, and indeed, the majority are dated in the 19th and 20th centuries.

The War Memorial is in the south-west corner and will be the subject of next week’s article.

The Northamptonshire Family History Society is currently undergoing a major project, that of researching and documenting all Memorial Inscriptions in churches and churchyards  in Northamptonshire.  If you have an interest in this subject and would like to find out more, perhaps buy the book of ‘St Mary Magdalene Memorial Inscriptions’, please visit the Society at www.northants-fhs.org.

If you have any information, documents or pictures relating to any normal day-to-day living in the village during the past few decades (or earlier, if you have them) we would like to hear from you.

The Exhibition on Saturday 1st November is not the end of our Archive Project, but just the start of what we hope will be an ongoing project over the next few years. With more material and research we’ll be bringing more fascinating facts to light.

Samuel Lee Christmas Distribution

Christmas Distribution 2014

.

This year, the Trustees of the Samuel Lee Charity will once again,  distribute Christmas parcels to Senior Citizens of Geddington,  Newton and Little Oakley who are 75 or over.

If you think you qualify, or have a friend or relative who might,
please contact me,
John Sutton, before 30th November.

Existing beneficiaries need not re-apply.

John Sutton
Chairman
24 Bright Trees Road
Telephone: 01536 742559

Archive Exhibition

Archive exhibition poster for village

 And don’t forget:
THERE IS NO ADMISSION FEE

Why not ‘Like’ us on Facebook?

ARCHIVE : ACTION #5

 ARCHIVE : ACTION #5

Archive: a collection of records of a place
Action: the process of doing something

In July, we asked if we could borrow, scan, photo or otherwise copy, any photographs, documents or artefacts that would represent Geddington’s history over the centuries.

Our aim is to create an online archive of our village.

Our weekly article covers the fifth category which is:

CHARITIES

CHARITY: The giving of help, money, food etc, to those in need

17th century Geddington had its share of people in need, and no-one was more aware of this, or did more for them, than Sir Robert Dallington. In an extract of his Will dated 25th April 1636, Sir Robert bequeathed:

“To the Poor people of Geddington, in the County of Northampton, where I was born, the sum of £300 for continuance for ever of such relief as I have formerly given and allowed to twenty-four people there weekly in Bread and in such manner as they now have it together with such relief in money at ye Feast of Christmas and Easter every year as they have formerly had from me.”

Dallington Will complete

Sir Robert Dallington’s Will

The Will laid out terms to his Executors to purchase Land or Annuity to the yearly value of £15, “for the perpetual relief of four and twenty Poor people.” Land was purchased in Loddington and to this day, 24 people receive bread every Saturday and a gift of £20 at Easter and Christmas.
(A full account of this Charity is posted under ‘Village Life’ on this website.)

Of the four active charities in Geddington, the Dallington Charity is the oldest, but not the only one to cater for the needs of Geddington residents.

The Samuel Lee Charity was created in 1717 after the death of the Ranger of Geddington Chase in 1708. Land was also bought, but in Cranford, and the Charity benefited from ironstone deposits found underneath the land. However, in 1898 the land was sold and the money invested in Consols by the official Trustees of Charitable Estates.

In the 21st century, interest from current investments (plus donations and fund-raising activities) has allowed every resident over the age of 75 (and who applies) to receive a gift at Christmas. Over the years the gift has taken many forms, from vouchers to be spent with local tradespeople, to a ‘hamper’ of Christmas goodies.  The words ‘relief’ and ‘need’ no longer apply, but it’s a tradition that is willingly carried out by the Trustees and well received by the beneficiaries.

Samuel Lee’s tomb lies in Geddington churchyard, to the south of the church and to the right of the path leading from the gate to the south porch. A recent addition has been a memorial stone, engraved with the exact words that is on the tomb, but which are fading with age. An Annual Luncheon in 2008 was held to commemorate (and raise funds) the 300th anniversary of his death.
(Again, a full account of this Charity is posted under ‘Village Life’ on this website.)

Mr Samuel Lee's Tomb

Mr Samuel Lee’s Tomb

If you have any information, documents or pictures relating to any normal day-to-day living in the village, during the past few decades (or earlier centuries, if you have them) we would like to hear from you.

The Exhibition on Saturday 1st November is not the end of our Archive Project, but just the start of what we hope will be an ongoing project over the next few years. With more material and research we’ll bring fascinating facts to light.

Ged-Fest 2014

Ged-Fest 2014,
the free music festival aiming to raise money for charities,
was held at The White Hart in West Street in Geddington
over the weekend of 5-6th July.

The live bands included:

Telstars, The Contenders, Yodaclub
Bentback Tulips, Nicole Hope and House Of Paris
The Replicats, Hogwash.

There were stalls selling hog-roast and ice cream, T-shirts and strawberries.

Nicola Thornton, landlady, tells geddington.net that they raised an impressive £1375 for Prostaid, the charity for prostrate cancer.

Prostaid

ARCHIVE : ACTION #4

 ARCHIVE : ACTION #4

Archive: a collection of records of a place
Action: the process of doing something

In July, we asked if we could borrow, scan, photo or otherwise copy, any photographs, documents or artefacts that would represent Geddington’s history over the centuries.

Our aim is to create an online archive of our village.

We have divided all the wonderful material we’ve received into categories and for our fourth weekly article, the category is:

SPORTS

With so many types of sports that have been played over the years, it’s difficult to choose just one to write about. The list of sports played in this village covers:

Football   (of course)
Cricket            Tennis              Bowls
Hockey            Rounders         Badminton      Ping Pong

As football seems to be one of our national sports, perhaps some of the early history of Geddington’s clubs would be most appropriate, so here goes:

The first recorded football match was in 1879 although it wasn’t until 1883 that an official club was formed. However, there was no official ground until the formation of the Recreation Field at the back of the allotments in Grafton Road on 1931, so play took place in various favourite places around the village and sometimes, further afield.

Over the years, a number of clubs have been in existence and in the late part of the 19th century and early 20th century, three clubs all played regularly in the village: Geddington Montrose, Geddington Stars and Geddington Working Men’s Club.

Geddington Montrose 1906-7 complete

Geddington Montrose FC 1906-07

The most successful club was Geddington Montrose FC, which formed in 1903 and lasted 75 years. In the first four years of its existence, the club won 3 league titles and in the 60s and 70s, won a further three league titles and four cup finals.

The most successful footballer to come from the village was Herbert Dainty, who played for Geddington before progressing to senior level, where ultimately he played for Dundee Football Club in Scotland.

Geddington Stars 1894-5 complete

Geddington Stars FC 1894-95

Our images of the 1902/3 and 1906/7 season’s teams show the Dainty name appear along with other, still familiar, village family names. But it isn’t only in the Montrose team that the name Dainty and the others appear. In the Geddington Stars Football Club pictures of their 1894/5 and 1895/6 season’s teams, there are many more. Of particular interest in the Stars’ 1894/5 season is the President of the Stars, Mr John Kyle, whose splendid black beard had by the 1906 Montrose picture, turned very white. Mr Kyle was landlord of The Royal George in Wood Street.

The W.M.C. team was reformed in 1976 for the benefit of village players who were not able to get a game for either of the two Montrose teams in existence at that time. By 1981 the Montrose teams had folded and a second W.M.C team formed to play on Saturdays, but by 1994 the Sunday team had closed and only one team was left and even this closed shortly after, leaving Geddington with no current teams playing.

Pictures mentioned in the text, but not on screen,
can be seen in our Exhibition.

If you have any information, documents or pictures relating to any of the football clubs (do you disagree with the dates, perhaps?), we would like to hear from you.

The Exhibition on Saturday 1st November is not the end of our Archive Project, but just the start of what we hope will be an on-going project over the next few years. With more material and research we’ll bring many more fascinating facts to light.

Acknowledgements and credits will be given on the archive pages after November 1st

Public Meeting for Flood Awareness

Just in time for the wet season!

Community Pathfinder Project (flooding)

PUBLIC MEETING

MONDAY
27 OCTOBER 2014,
7.30pm

In the June, the Northamptonshire County Council sent Mary Dhonau and her colleagues to put on a Road Show of their Flood Awareness Project. They brought with them, amongst many items, community flood maps, flood protection products for the home and a potential for a free community flood store and rain gauge, with an associated warning system.

Following on from the information they received at the Road Show, they will be holding a Public Meeting at the Village Hall on Monday 27 October at 7.30pm. Mary Dhonau, from M.D.A. Community Flood Consultants comments:

“My colleague Richard Jones (who will be known to many of you as he has undertaken the community flood investigations) and I will attend, and will take up no more than about an hour of your time.

We will talk about the project, what it’s like to flood and how to plan, prepare and mitigate against it. We will also offer free property level flood surveys to those at risk,
discuss the free flood store equipment we will be able to provide as part of the project, try to see if we can enlist any volunteer flood wardens (who will be given free training) and again, ask for any more information about flood history that Richard Jones can add to his maps (which he will have with him on the night).”

She continues:

“These maps will be given to each Parish Council to enable them to target support into the right areas, should a flood occur. It will also feed information into their Parish Emergency Plan, to help provide support to the vulnerable residents.

I am also able to bring property level flood protection with me to exhibit.

We would very much like residents to attend, as you or the Parish Councillors may wish to consider items or issues to raise with me, and the money available relating to this project!”

Mary has been flooded herself and knows only too well what an appalling experience it is. She said at the Road Show that it was a little known fact that in the 2012 floods, over half of the insurance claims were from surface water flooding – something that could happen almost anywhere, any time.

It really is in our own interests to attend this meeting, please try to do so.

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