Latest News

Marilyn – As you’ve never seen her before!

Blood Brothers, currently playing in the Village Hall until Saturday, has an extra WOW factor, in the form of a terrific image of Marilyn Monroe.

Local artist, Ricardo Insu-cao, has produced many of the latest GADS’ posters, but he’s outdone himself this time.

To get the full effect from this piece of art, book yourself into the Village Hall by phoning 01536 742257.

Tickets are Adults £7, concessions £6
Wine bar opens 7pm
Curtain up 7.30pm

 

Geddington – A life in words and memories – March

This report is the last of our postings about the life of the Holding sisters who were born in Geddington around 1887 and 1890, lived through two world wars and experienced huge challenges and momentous change in their shared lives in Dallington House and later the The Bungalow on Kettering Road.

The report includes a few of the many photographs found with the diaries and gives an insight into the reality of daily life in the early to mid twentieth century. Throughout it all the sisters showed strength of character, intellectual curiosity, loyal friendship, an appreciation of the beauty of nature and the countryside around them and an understanding of the characters with whom they shared their lives.

‘Kitty’ was one of those characters.

********************************************************************************************************

Carrie (Caroline) and Daisy (Margaret) Holding, daughters of George Holding, timber merchant, and Esther Farmer of Dallington

Spring 1925

It has been said that ‘the horse is the friend of Man’. I am quite sure that Kitty and Dad are friends.

Kitty you must know has been in the family for upwards of thirty years. She has surely stood the test of time. Never were Master and mare more devoted to each other, and never did friends understand each others’ moods as these two seem to do. Many is the journey they have taken together in summer sun and winter snow.

Daisy and Carrie with their mother

Kitty always goes her own way; she either trots at a round pace or walks leisurely along. It has ever been thus and her Master knows full well it is too late in the day to reform her. Kitty is a blue roan mare with a sleek glossy coat. She, and her trap, and of course her Master are known for miles around. ‘Ah!. she’s been a good ‘un’  is an oft repeated remark. It was at the end of the South African War that Kitty began her career in the timber trade. Previous to this she had been rather overworked in the grocery business and had for some time been carelessly treated. Loving and tender care was bestowed upon her, for somehow she made her way into our hearts at once. Her soft nose would be pushed into our hands and she would snuff and blow as if to say ‘Don’t you love me? I really am a dear.’

Carrie in The Bungalow dressmaking

As children we early learned to love her and she would follow us anywhere. It was our delight to feed her on sweets, sugar, biscuits and bread. Friday was Market Day and the day also when Dad brought the children home from school. Frequently a few small friends accompanied us to the outskirts of the town and these too all loved grey Kitty. In these days Kit was in her prime and her chief duty was to run in her Master’s trap conveying him to markets, timber sales and business journeys. She was always smart and well groomed and the pride of his heart. Here I am reminded of  the various stable lads who practically grew up in Dad’s employ and remained with him until he retired from business.

Joe was the Autocrat of the Stable Yard but his chief duties lay with Alice and Gilliver, Blossom, Short and Charlie and the glossy cart horses who carted home the timber before Dad insulted them by buying a tractor! ‘Big Kitty’ as she was called to distinguish her from ‘Little Kitty’, little Sister’s steed, was cared for by the juniors.

First of all comes to mind; quiet ‘Ben’, very few were the words he ever spoke but he was most faithful and remained so as long as he was in our employ. It is only a few short months ago that we attended his funeral. He died as a result of an accident.

Next came ‘Fred’, the son of our foreman and the ‘universal cleanser’, Mother Dear’s charlady and always our dear friend. He stayed with us until King and Country called him and he made good, gaining a commission.We were always proud of Fred and he still enjoys a chat whenever he comes over this way.

‘Johnson’ too, abrupt and curt, but very particular and painstaking answered the call of duty. We have lost sight of him somehow but I am sure he is a good citizen somewhere. Poor old ‘Fire Walter’ the bane of Little Sister’s life because he had fits, is now in the Workhouse Infirmary. Drink, I am afraid, was largely responsible for this. He was one of Mother Dear’s boys and Oh! what high hopes she entertained of him. Luckily she never knew how he had fallen.

‘Dick’ now in Australia, John our old gardener and handy man, ‘Music’ and several others are all associated in my mind with the grey mare.

Very fastidious and dainty as any of her sex she would only drink from one certain pail and would go without water for a day or two rather than drink from a vessel she objected to. Saturday evenings and Bank Holidays, Mother Dear, Dad, Little Sister and I nearly always went for a ride with Kitty. On one never to be forgotten occasion Kitty took her family forty miles in one day for their summer holiday. Oh! there never was such a pony!

Is this Kitty?

Then came the War, and it was rumoured that the Government were commandeering all horses of a certain stamp. What if they took Kitty? That could never be. This quiet, gentle creature must never know the horrors of fighting. These latter years Kitty has assisted not only her Master but his neighbours in light duties, running in ‘the trolley ‘ carting poles or potatoes, bricks or light articles of furniture. She is a skilled timber carter and it is a pleasure to see her with her Master in the woods so dear to their hearts. Kit always knows just where her Master is or what he is doing and starts off when she thinks it is time to knock off work and go home!

***********************************************************************************************************

Note: The photographs included come from the sisters’ collection. If any captions are incorrect please let us know.

The website team hope you have enjoyed a year with the Holdings and would welcome your comments or ideas for the next series.

 Families?    Buildings?    Customs?

Most of the diary material and the photographs will make its way into our Archive but there are many photographs where neither people nor places can be confirmed. If you know the family or lived in the village 50 years ago maybe you could help?

Do get in touch using the contact details on the home page or the phone numbers given in the Annual Review article earlier this month. We would love to hear from you.

County Council Elections

The next County Council election will take place on 4 May 2017.

The election will be called on 24 March, 2017 and all 57 of the council’s seats will be up for election.

Voting

The way we all register to vote has changed. The new system is called ‘Individual Electoral Registration’. You can still contact your local district or borough council to register to vote, or you can now register online. The deadline to register to vote in the next elections is Thursday 13 April 2017.
Under the old system the ‘head of every household’ could register everyone who lived at their address. Under the new system, everyone is responsible for registering themselves. You need to provide a few more details to register – including your national insurance number and date of birth. This makes the electoral register more secure.

How do I register to vote?

  1. Go to www.gov.uk/register-to-vote
  2. Fill in your name, address, date of birth and a few other details. You’ll also need your national insurance number, which can be found on your national insurance card, or in official paperwork such as payslips, or letters about benefits or tax credits
  3. Look out for a confirmation to say you’re registered.
    To find out more go to www.gov.uk/yourvotematters

Postal votes and proxy votes

If you are unable to vote at your polling station and would like a postal vote you need to apply by 5pm on 18 April 2017.
If you wish to appoint a proxy (someone to vote on your behalf at this election) you need to apply by 5pm on 25 April 2017. In both cases, you will need to contact your local district or borough council to obtain the required forms.

A Community Website in Action

Hello to all our sponsors, ‘friends’ and website followers, occasional and regular.

As another year of website activity draws to a close the Website Committee took the opportunity to look back over a very busy year. While the wider world was coming to terms with Brexit, Trump, massacres and momentous trips on the Space Station, the website kept its focus firmly on life in and around Geddington.

Firstly a big thank you to all our loyal sponsors and those of you who have sent in news, made the news or reported on the news – no ‘fake news’ here!

We hope you enjoy the run of photo images attached to this post and that they bring back happy memories for most of you and remind us that we live in a very caring, fun loving and active community in which we can all play our part. With around 56,000 hits last year we know that many of you use the website as a reference point, a source of news and information and a way of keeping in touch if you are now living further away.

We need your help to make it even better.The website committee is keen to encourage a few more village residents to join the team, feeding news, information and archive material into our records.

Are you interested in local history?  Could you do some research for us?  Or write an article?

Are you a keen photographer?  Could you take  photographs at village events? Or edit some of our archive material?

Do you attend meetings of a village organisation?  Could you keep the website up to date with your news?

Do you live in an area of the village that is under represented in our news?   Make your voice heard!

We’d really like to hear from you and discuss how we can put your talents to good use, making the website as relevant and far reaching as possible.

The good news?  We don’t hold lots of meetings; we are very informal; we share ideas (and we have some good ones!) and, more importantly, the workload, and it is very rewarding to see our efforts on the web!

Do join us!  Get in touch using the Contact Us facility on the website or ring Pam or Janet on 742292 or 726416 to find out more.

We look forward to hearing from you and to continuing to provide the best service possible to the village.

Tony Locock, Pam Hopkins, Janet Jones and Ricardo Insua Cao – Your website committee.

The Drop-in Session

Sunday 12th March 2017

11am – 2pm

The Parish Plan and what it’s all about.
An Exhibition of the Plan and some of the village organisations that make the village what it is.

 and, of course, where would an event at the Village Hall be without the essential refreshments?

Dallington Charity rep: Paul

Queen Street Road Closure Notice

A small, but important, part of Queen Street will be closed for up to four days from 3rd April: this will allow contractors to install a gas supply to No 1 Queen Street.

.

Diversion knowledge is essential if you are a visitor to the village, however, residents who use the bridge and ford, from either direction, will be aware that access will have to be via the A4300 (New Road on the map), whether from West Street or Queen Street.

Map and contact details below:

How fortunate (or perhaps carefully planned) that Geddington school is closed for the Easter break from 31st March to 19th April.

Now you see it, now you don’t!

Storm Doris created much damage and destruction throughout parts of Great Britain and Geddington also had its problems.

.

One of the trees that was damaged in the village, was one that affected the use of the ford. Previously this tree had been pollarded, but despite the lowering of its crown, its roots weren’t strong enough to stand up to the winds in late February.

Our keen-eyed correspondent, Frank Harding, was on hand to capture the removal of the tree by photo image and film.

And how it was done . . .

Other damage, here in Grafton Road . . .

Northamptonshire County Council News

Adult Learning Courses.

The summer programme for adult learning courses, scheduled for April – July, can now be booked online. There are hundreds of courses covering dozens of subjects taking place at venues throughout Northamptonshire.

Go to: www.northamptonshire.gov.uk and search for ‘Adult Learning Courses.

 

 

“Boudicca in a Cottage”

“Boudicca in a Cottage”

A tribute to Angie Cooksley 1937–2017

On Wednesday 15 February, friends and family gathered at Geddington Church to celebrate the life of Angie Cooksley, who died peacefully on 2 February aged 80. This is the family eulogy that we would like to share with those who were unable to attend the service, or for those present who requested to read it again. Please do feel free to share with anyone who would like to read it. It was read at the funeral by Angie’s granddaughter.

– –  –  –  –  –  –

Please click on this link to read the eulogy:
Boudicca in a Cottage A Tribute to Angie Cooksley

Geddington – A life in words and memories – February

Welcome to February 1929

The Holding sisters continue to live in The Bungalow on Kettering Road; Carrie works as a tailoress and applies her skill to everything from evening gowns to corsets. Daisy, struggling with ill health looks after the young boarders who stay with them during term time at St Alban’s School, Geddington.

January has been a long month and much of it has been spent looking after their father so the two sisters were pale and weary as they anticipated February and the start of spring.  Daisy  mentions that three of the old elms on the New Road have been cut down. ‘it seems a pity but I suppose they really were not safe on a main thoroughfare’

How topical given the recent storms!

Sadly the winter was to remain harsh and cold and the reality of life with no central heating and limited water resources gave the sisters the pain of chilblains, the misery of damp beds and the dreariness of frostbitten days. There was some fun though and, at the end, a larder full of marmalade and a garden full of snowdrops and spring bulbs.

***********************************************************************************************************

February   28 days

1st: The heavy rain I wished for came last night and, like many another wish fulfilled it was not exactly perfect. For oh! how the wind blew and the rain beat on the roof and windows. We were all restless.

Somehow we have felt tired and off colour all day. I finished my book and listened to the Boxing Match at the Albert Hall between Phil Scott and Sandwina. Was it depraved taste? I like to experience most things and judge for myself.

2nd: Candlemas Day.  There is nothing like work,especially housework when one feels rather grey and so we bustle about and clean up generally. Just before dinner, as I was expending my energy polishing floors , I was surprised by a tap at the back window and there gazing at me in a scared manner was a gander! Poor old boy he didn’t like leaving his familiar farm yard but I hear he has settled down now in his new home with his two wives.

3rd: St Blasius, the patron saint of throats. Colder but bright and beautiful. Sitting listening to the Wireless Service I heard Cowper’s beautiful hymn ‘Oh for a closer walk with God’ and at once I was in a little old summerhouse at the end of a worn, flagged path in an old world garden at Olney. In thought I had gone back to a sunny summer evening not so long ago when Little Sister and I sat there after hearing stories of the poet.

I think to myself how many famous men and women began life in a tiny village. The towns need the villages, and the villages the towns.

4th: I think this must be the sharpest frost of this very cold winter. Nearly everything in the pantry was frozen and we had ‘frozen mutton’ for dinner. Whilst watching for our daily Carrier, a most marvelous person by the way, I noticed more spikes of bulbs pushing up through the frost bound soil. I have just been complimented(?) Joan (a child boarder) has asked me if I was alive 600 years ago and did I know Queen Eleanor?..The children have no idea of age and I have been trying to explain to them the allotted three score years and 10. They were greatly interested in Great Grannie Croft’s photograph.

6th Wednesday: A lovely bright morning. I discovered I needed a few things from town badly. Well, it really was time to buy Seville oranges for the marmalade and off we sallied! It was delightful to step from our warm cosy ‘Bus right into the Picadilly Cafe and to sit sipping coffee and eating cream doughnuts. The shop next door was a galaxy of splendour. Golden oranges, gleaming lemons and grape-fruit, lettuce, celery and all the things my soul loves. Bowls of snowdrops, hyacinths, sheaves of tulips, baskets of mimosa and there in a gilded cage in the corner, a pair of brilliant green love birds.

11th Monday: The children come in all aglow and rosy from their exercise in the chill air. I wish I looked as fresh and happy when I am cold! Whips and tops are the great thing now. Marbles are quite a secondary consideration.

12th Pancake Day: We had our Pancakes last night! The very sharpest frost we have had for many winters. Everything frozen. It seems the best thing to take the children for a run after tea. They are surprised to find I can really spin a top. We run races to keep warm. The new moon was high in the sky. Ominous cracks are heard in the red water tank.

13th Ash Wednesday: Winter tightens its grip. We keep fires going and the stove is in requisition. What shall we do if it lasts? The brook is frozen and this morning the children were sliding on it as they came from church.

14th St. Valentine’s Day: The scene is more wintry than ever as the air is full of feathery snow. Our ruse of sending the kiddies valentines is quite a success. They are properly deceived and duly delighted. The icicles still hang from the eaves in spite of the sunshine. The eggs were frozen in the hen roost. Roast potatoes and hot drinks send us all warm to bed.

16th: We are constantly hewing and melting ice.

18th Monday again: Quite early the marmalade was on a-boilin’.  So severe and cold was it we were glad to light the stove to assist in warming up the icy air. All the water, hard and soft, is frozen and we are as careful as can be of every drop. As soon as the girlies come from school they are off to play in the Wood Yard. Eagerly they remove the ‘ice-berg’, otherwise the solid block that was once a zinc of soft water. They are resplendent in ‘camphor bags’ suspended by a cord round their neck.  A preventive of colds I presume! May the charm work.

I am obliged to sit with my feet in ‘mustard and water’ sipping hot grog.

This water business is as worrying as a Summer’s drought. Soft water a solid block and when we do manage to hew it and thaw it, it is dirty and acid. Hard water pumps frozen, or otherwise out of gear, and the village well such yards away. The dykes so far are full of frozen mud. So nasty is the water we cannot wash our faces clean. Today Little Sister gave me some of her lavender water and I cleansed my skin with that!!

**********************************************************************************************************

 

Copyright © 2013 Geddington.net | Legal Notice | Website by Octagon